Sunday, June 6, 2010

Breaking Bread

I've always loved rustic handcrafted breads resembling those that 16th century monks and peasants baked to sell at village markets. Perfect with wine, cheese and friends.

Besides tearing pieces from the loaf in a peasant-like, down-to-earth way, I also like to break bread with friends using the herringbone method. Here's how:

+ Use a good serrated knife and gentle sawing motions.
+ Cut a 1-inch-wide wedge off one edge of the loaf. Cut another wedge at one end of the first cut in the opposite direction, angling into the body of the loaf.
+ Return to the first side and cut parallel to the first cut to make the first slice. Repeat on the opposite side.
+ Continue this pattern, alternating the cuts from side to side.

22 comments:

Stacey Dawn said...

Oh my - I think I can smell it's delicousness from here!

Barefoot from Heaven said...

I would have loved to sit at your table and enjoy this bread together with you over a great chat.
Love the way you did this gal.
Hugs D.

Beach House Living said...

Who thought cutting bread could so artful? I however think it looks so good I'm not sure I could wait for it to be cut.

Linda@ Lime in the Coconut said...

Ummmmm. A great bread, a french chees and an argentinian wine. Life doesn't get much better!

Thanks for the cool bread breaking instructions!

Aditi said...

Yummyyy...with lotz of cheese and
probably a glass of red wine...uuummmhhh

Linda P said...

Thank you for this photo showing a different method of breaking bread with friends which I must try. Bless you!

Lorna said...

I have never seen this before - looks lovely. I recently discovered a new recipe for brown bread which includes hazel nut yoghurt - gorgeous, i now bake 2 loaves every second day. Nothing can beat the smell of freshly baked bread.

Susan Erickson said...

mmmmm...fresh bread and a saucer of balsamic vinegar and good virgin, olive oil, glass of wine.....hard to beat that. The herringbone cutting is very sweet....

mise said...

I like this a lot - the deliberation of the cutting somehow pays tribute to the care that went into the making of the bread. I'll give it a go with my next loaf.

S. Etole said...

this speaks home and friendship and continuity ...

Pooch Morning Glory said...

that is so cool. that loaf certainly deserves the care you have given it.
~laura

RuneE said...

This looks good enough to eat :-)

simpledaisy said...

Ooh..that bread looks fabulous!!

Linda P said...

Thank you for Abbey Style quiet thoughts and images, Becky, and thank you for your recent visit to my new blog home.

Linda P said...

Thank you once more for your kind visit. I'm still learning the technicalities of blogging so please be patient with me re communicating. Have a good day!

Jeanne said...

This says peace to me...breaking bread with family and friends..looks declicious too! Thanks for the tip and many thanks for your lovely comments :)

jeanne

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

And, it smells sooo good!

lakeviewer said...

A true passion, breaking of the bread with family and community. Love the cutting ritual, the movement and rhythm of those slices.

ELK said...

filling the soul with this image and those words . elk

Dimple said...

What a beautiful pattern that way of slicing creates! It looks almost as good as it tastes! (I love homemade bread, and a round loaf doesn't even need a bread pan. It always tastes delicious!)

Jeanne Klaver said...

I never knew anything about the herringbone method! I'm going to impress my friends with it.

Thistle Cove Farm said...

Thank you so much! I make this type of bread but have not know this method of cutting...ever so much better than grubby hands pulling it apart.